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Module directory 2018-19

JOE'S BUTLER

❶O, that I were a glove upon that hand, That I might touch that cheek! This module covers some of the fundamental skills required by biochemists.

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This is a basic marine biology course that covers the biology of the marine animals at the phyletic level. The course will equip the students with an understanding of the taxonomy, phylogeny and basic biology of species from over 20 invertebrate phyla that they will experience directly on the field course. The module will also touch on some marine vertebrates eg pinnipeds [seals], cetaceans [whales and dolphins] and birds. The module is entirely taught on a day field course, with lectures covering functional morphology and evolutionary relationships complementing the practical work focussing on identification, classification, anatomy, ecology and behaviour.

The field course will take place in the September preceding commencement of the level 5 taught modules. Dr Pavel Kratina Overlap: In this module you will obtain knowledge of basic ecological principles and learn to integrate theory with empirical observations. You will develop understanding of i distribution, growth and regulation of single species populations; ii interacting species pairs such as competition, predation, herbivory, parasitism; and iii structure and dynamics of multitrophic systems such as food webs, ecological communities and ecosystems.

The topics will also cover spatial aspect of ecological systems in the metapopulation and metacommunity context, highlighting relationships between biodiversity, stability and ecosystem function. The module includes lectures and a residential field course.

In this module you will obtain knowledge of basic ecological practice and fieldwork, and learn to integrate theory with empirical observations and data collection. You will gain practical experience in the field and also observe researchers collecting scientific data for both terrestrial and freshwater aquatic ecosystems. This will build on, and relate to, the theoretical aspects covered directly in earlier ecology modules.

Dr Guy Hanke Overlap: Most of the teaching will be via small-group tutorials where students will develop an appreciation and experience in various aspects of communication in biochemical science. The module will focus on types and structure of scientific literature, as well as types of journals and the process of peer review.

Tutorials will cover approaches to effective short essay writing and delivering scientific talks. Attendance at research seminars is required and a library workshop to developing literature search skills.

Tutorials will require a high level of student participation. Wednesday 10 am - 11 am Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm Office Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6; Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm.

Prof Richard Nichols Overlap: In this module we look at advanced topics in experimental design, data analysis and science communication. Topics covered include the design of large-scale studies, advanced data analysis techniques in R, and statistics which build on Research Methods and Communications I from the year before. The tutorial component continues the theme from second year with further writing exercises, a mock exam essay and popular science writing practice.

Weeks 2, 5, 9: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm Lecture Semester 1: Weeks 1, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 11, Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm IT Class Semester 1: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, Friday 9 am - 12 pm Semester 1: Prof Stephen Rossiter Overlap: Decision-making and the evolution of adaptive strategies of individuals, optimal strategy sets and habitat selection are also included. Comparative socio-ecology including sexual and kin selection, reproductive strategies and social structure is considered.

You will also look at resource patchiness, predictability and productivity as determinants of individual and social behaviour. Monday 2 pm - 4 pm Off-Campus Visit Semester 1: Saturday 9 am - 5 pm Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm Workshop Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm. Dr Yannick Wurm Overlap: Research in ecology and evolution has addressed many important issues as empirical and theoretical levels.

However, relatively little is known about the genomic basis underlying phenotypic change. This module will highlight recent developments in ecological and evolutionary genomics, including major research questions and approaches used to address them. Coursework will include formal lectures, extensive critical reading of primary literature peer-reviewed publications and extensive in-class contributions by students. Dr Jayne Dennis Overlap: This course will introduce personal human genomics.

We will examine the potential and pitfalls of applying human genetics and genomics to individual humans. The lectures will examine the structure and functions of the human genome, and technologies used to study these.

We will survey methods for making inferences from genomic data about: The course will introduce concepts and methods of functional genomics and pharmacogenomics. Workshops will cover ethical aspects of personal genomics, the limitations of personal genomics, data interpretation and the need for model organisms. Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm Semester 1: Weeks 2, 6, 9, Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm. Workshops will cover ethical aspects of personal genomics, the limitations of personal genomics, data interpretation and visualisation, the need for model organisms, and bioinformatic methods.

Prof Andrew Leitch Overlap: Transmission genetics OR Genes and Bioinformatics This module will introduce strategies and methods for identifying the molecular genetic basis of inherited human disorders and other traits in particular how linkage disequilibrium LD is used to identify the loci involved.

It will use examples from the current literature to better understand genetic variation at a population and species level. It will examine quantitative traits in humans and other species; in particular the heritability estimates to infer the relative contribution of genes and the environment to important quantitative traits and disorders. Together the information will lead to an understanding of genetic drift and natural selection acting on the DNA sequence, the chromosome and genome organisation.

The module will explore the evolution of genomic sequences and of chromosomes. Particular attention is paid to evolutionary processes observed at repetitive DNA sequences and the role of chromosomes in transmitting genetic material through mitosis and meiosis.

It explores the role and evolution of sex chromosomes, the evolution of sex and of sexual selection. The course should students to achieve a critical understanding of thinking and research in the genetic processes of evolution.

Monday 10 am - 12 pm Workshop Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm Semester 1: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm. Dr Paul Hurd Overlap: This module is designed to provide students with an introduction into the variety of ways that genetics and genomics have been applied in biotechnology and functional genomics.

The module covers a variety of topics including biotechnology, protein expression, microarrays, proteomics, systems biology, genome projects assembly. Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm IT Class Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm Workshop Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11, Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm.

Dr Chris Faulkes Overlap: This module covers the following: Evolution of monotremes, marsupial adpative radiation. Evolution and classification of eutherian mammals, cladistics, molecular approaches to phylogeny reconstruction.

Adaptation in the main orders of eutherian mammals. Evolution of reproductive strategies and social evolution: Recent controversies in mammalian evolution. Tuesday 9 am - 11 am Off-Campus Visit Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 5 pm Lab Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm IT Class Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 6 pm. Dr Brendan Curran Overlap: This module covers some of the fundamental skills required by biologists. This module will support students in acquiring a variety of key skills such as essay writing, information handling, oral and written communication skills, literature search techniques and appropriate use of referencing and citations.

Through personal investigations, workshops on critical thinking and a series of talks from professionals, students will be encouraged to consider the role of biological sciences in an applied context and gain a more global perspective of their discipline.

Students will be given an opportunity to explore various career choices, to reflect on their own career aspirations and to meet with professional scientists from diverse backgrounds. Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9: Weeks 3, 5, 9, Wednesday 10 am - 11 am Lecture Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am Workshop Semester 1: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm.

Dr Ewan Main Overlap: This module covers some of the fundamental skills required by biochemists. Through personal investigations, workshops on critical thinking and a series of talks from professionals, students will be encouraged to consider the role of biochemical sciences in an applied context and gain a more global perspective of their discipline.

Wednesday 10 am - 11 am Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am Workshop Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 4 pm Semester 2: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm. Prof Kenneth Linton Overlap: This module provides an introduction to cell biology. It covers pro and eukaryotic cell structure, the structure and function of the cell membrane, the organelles, the nucleus and the cytoskeleton.

Interactions between cell components, the cell cycle and cell differentiation from stem cells to specialised cells are all examined in detail. Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, Friday 9 am - 11 am Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm.

Dr David Hone Overlap: This module covers essential topics of whole-organism biology, introducing the theory and mechanisms of evolution and speciation, the fossil record and human evolution.

Monday 1 pm - 3 pm Off-Campus Visit Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 5 pm IT Class Semester 1: This module covers the essentials and fundamental concepts of population and community ecology as well as applied issues such as conservation. There is an one-week residential field course where students will study organisms in their natural environments, rather than in the laboratory.

Monday 11 am - 1 pm. Dr Dunja Aksentijevic Overlap: This module provides an introduction to physiology. The structure and function of major systems including the nervous, digestive, respiratory and circulatory systems are surveyed in a variety of different taxa and physiological functioning including homeostasis, temperature regulation, gas exchange, digestion and the endrocrine systems are all reviewed.

Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm Lab Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm Semester 2: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm. This module will cover amino acids, the fundamentals of protein structure, isolation and purification of proteins, modification of proteins, and methods of determining protein conformation.

You will also cover the basics of enzyme catalysis and kinetics with specific case studies. Other topics include ion transport, and other transport proteins, and the utilisation of proteins and soluble cofactors to generate and store metabolic energy. You will cover the basics of metabolism in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle, as well as ATP synthesis and membrane bound electron transfer in mitochondria.

Chloroplasts in plants and algae, and molecular motors, such as muscles, that consume metabolic energy are also covered. A detailed module synopsis will be handed out in the first lecture, and summary outlines of subsequent lectures will be available on the school teaching website for guidance. Thursday 9 am - 11 am. This module consists of an introduction to genetics, a description of the process by which genetic information is converted into the molecules that make up living things, and a review of the essential properties of those molecules.

Genetics topics covered include DNA structure, classical and molecular genetics and genomics. We then examine how information flows from DNA to RNA and then to protein to give the recognisable phenotypic features of living things. Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, Thursday 9 am - 11 am Workshop Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm Semester 1: This module teaches the practical and analytical skills required for molecular and cellular biology.

The module will start by introducing basic laboratory safety and routine laboratory procedures, it will then move on through DNA extraction and purification to microbiological and physiological techniques. Wednesday 10 am - 11 am Lab Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 1 pm Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm Semester 1: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm Semester 1: Weeks 6, 8, 9: Weeks 6, 8, 9, 11, Friday 2 pm - 4 pm.

This module teaches the practical and analytical skills required for biologists. Starting with basic laboratory safety and routine laboratory procedures, the module then moves on through protein extraction and purification to microbiological and physiological techniques and finally studies involving whole multicellular organisms.

Wednesday 9 am - 10 am Lab Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, Monday 2 pm - 5 pm Semester 2: This module teaches the practical and analytical skills required for biochemists. Starting with basic laboratory safety and routine laboratory procedures, the module then move on through protein extraction and purification to microbiological and physiological techniques and techniques of practical chemistry. Wednesday 10 am - 11 am Lab Semester 2: Monday 1 pm - 5 pm.

To Be Confirmed Overlap: Students are helped to secure a work placement through a range of employability-initiatives that are already in place at the SBCS. The placement will normally be a months in duration and must not be less than 6 months in length. This is accommodated within a BSc programme extended to four years duration. SBCS will also identify a mentor in the workplace at each employer to provide local support and to monitor student performance. It is anticipated that students will undertake a wide range of activities during the placement, so as to gain an awareness of professional practice.

Students must complete a training diary during the placement and submit a report at the end of their placement, as well as giving a presentation to fellow students. Weeks 8, 10, Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm Lecture Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm Semester 2: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm IT Class Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 5, 9, 10, Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm Seminar Semester 1: In this module we look at how to design experiments, how to analyse and present the data obtained and how to communicate those results to others.

The lecture and workshop component includes the principles of experimental design, statistical analysis including t-tests, correlation and regression, ANOVA, ANCOVA and non-parametric tests and discussion of how to interpret and present data.

The tutorial component consists of a series of writing exercises designed to teach how to structure an argument and how to communicate ideas effectively. Weeks 4, 6, 8: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am Lecture Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm IT Class Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm Semester 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm Semester 2: Wednesday 3 pm - 5 pm.

The module will consist of lectures and workshops. Collectively these will cover the diversity of organisms on Earth with a primary emphasis on animals including previous diversity the fossil record their relationships and key characteristics. During the semester there will be workshops consisting of trips to the Natural History Museum, Grant Museum and London Zoo to allow further study of extant and fossil animals. Tuesday 9 am - 11 am Off-Campus Visit Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 4 pm Workshop Semester 1: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm.

Dr Angelika Stollewerk Overlap: This module is designed to provide you with detailed up-to-date knowledge of cell biological techniques, the structural organisation, development and differentiation of eukaryotic cells as well as key processes in development that are based on cell-cell interactions and cell movements. In the practicals you will learn standard cell biological techniques in histology and immunohistochemistry and you will be familiarised with the preparation of cell material from living organisms.

The module provides an invaluable foundation for genetics, biochemistry, molecular, neurobiological, physiological and biomedical programmes. Friday 11 am - 1 pm Lab Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm. Prof Maurice Elphick Overlap: The following themes will be covered in this module: Comparative anatomy and evolution of nervous systems. Invertebrates as model systems for understanding mechanisms of neural control of behaviour.

An introduction to comparative endocrinology, including the evolution and functions of neuropeptides as regulators of physiological and behavioural processes.

Comparative physiology of muscle and connective tissue. Comparative physiology of gas exchange. Comparative physiology of circulatory systems 8. Comparative physiology of osmoregulation 9. Comparative physiology of excretion. Monday 12 pm - 1 pm Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm Lab Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm IT Class Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm.

This module provides an overview of the evolution of sex, and covers the following topics: Friday 9 am - 11 am Off-Campus Visit Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 5 pm IT Class Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm Semester 1: Genes occupy most of a bacterial genome, but very little of the three million kb of DNA in the 23 pairs of chromosomes in the human genome, so what is a gene?

This module provides a molecular view. Gene structure is illustrated in the context of how a gene is transcribed to produce RNA, how the RNA is processed and translated to produce protein and how these processes are regulated through other DNA sequences and proteins. An introduction to bioinformatics will explain how to recognise, compile and identify genes, and infer protein sequence, from DNA sequence, including procedures for interrogating public sequence databases and phylogenetic analysis.

Thursday 11 am - 1 pm Lab Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 6 pm Semester 1: This module explores human hereditary disease in terms of genetics, pathogenesis, clinical features and clinical management.

We will look at key examples of chromosomal abnormalities i. Trisomy 21 , monogenic disease e. Students will be introduced to methods and techniques for identifying genetic loci associated with disease e. Finally, we will discuss issues around genetic screening, testing and counselling. Weeks 2, 3, 8, Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm. Prof Conrad Mullineaux Overlap: Diversity of microbial metabolisms. Bacterial growth and replication, including organization and division of the chromosome, yield and responses to temperature and nutrient availability.

Photolithotrophy, photoorganotrophy, chemilithotrophy and chemoorganotrophy. Fermentation and anaerobic respiration. Growth and extension metabolism of fungi. Nitrogen transformations by microorganisms in free-living and mutualistic settings. Microbiological standards in public health.

Clean water processing and waste-water treatment. Practical work will cover prokaryote photosynthesis, bacterial fermentation, fungal digestion of wood and nitrogen transformations in sediments, and microbiological water quality. There will be a brief consideration of clean water processing and waste-water treatment. Thursday 11 am - 1 pm Lab Semester 2: The aim of this module is to provide the students with an understanding of how the gene paradigm has changed with time.

By examining a number of seminal experiments in detail, and reviewing the development of genetics and reverse genetics in different model organisms, the first half of the module explains how classical approaches to genetics are gradually giving way to a genomics-based approach to this subject. The second half of the module explores the molecular mechanisms involved in ensuring that DNA, the repository of inherited information, achieves the difficult balance of change mutation and recombination and stability repair necessary for evolution to occur.

The various techniques involved in modern genetic analysis are covered as the module progresses. Thursday 9 am - 11 am Lab Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 12 pm Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 2 pm. This module coves a range of topics: Membrane functions and subcellular organelles; lipid structures; membrane proteins; mobility in membranes and methods for its measurement; cell signalling.

Friday 9 am - 11 am Lab Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 4 pm Semester 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 4 pm Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 4 pm Semester 2: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm Workshop Semester 2: Friday 3 pm - 6 pm.

Dr Greg Michael Overlap: This module introduces leading topics of interest in neuroscience, through study of which students will gain essential skills in academic and scientific writing, reading scientific literature and writing short reports. An introduction to research methods and statistics will also be provided. The module will aim to give a historical and scientific overview of neuroscience from early anatomists studying the nervous system to the significant contribution to the discipline made by Nobel laureates.

Monday 12 pm - 1 pm Lecture Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, Monday 10 am - 12 pm Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm Lab Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm IT Class Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 11 am. This module will introduce students to the development and anatomy of the nervous system. Topics will include the principles of nervous system development, axonal and dendritic growth.

The anatomical organisation of the central and peripheral nervous systems, including blood supply and functionally important neural circuits will also be covered. Lectures will be accompanied by practical workshops designed to encourage accurate observation and annotation skills and mastery of functional neuroanatomy.

Wednesday 9 am - 11 am Lab Semester 2: Weeks 8, 9, Friday 11 am - 2 pm. Dr Egle Solito Overlap: This module will introduce to the students the concept of the interaction of drugs and other exogenous chemicals with living organisms.

It will introduce students to the basic pharmacological principles and concepts which will define drug activity within the body including pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. These introductory lectures will give students a broad overview into approaches used in drug discovery, medicinal chemistry, main drug targets, drug absorption and routes of administration, drug metabolism and elimination, phamacokinetics, drug treatment of major medical conditions and rationale for prescribing a particular drug, the role of biotechnology in drug discovery, preclinical pharmaceutical development, understanding of the use of animals in pharmacology and adverse drug reactions.

Lectures will be delivered by experts in both academia and industry. In addition to formal lectures and interactive seminars, we will provide practical workshop sessions to reinforce the lectures. Weeks 1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, Wednesday 9 am - 11 am Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 6: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm Seminar Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 9: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm.

Dr James Whiteford Overlap: This module will cover some basic laboratory skills including experimental design and hands-on experience of a range of laboratory practical such as quantification of drugs in biological fluids techniques enabling them to develop skills of working safely and accurately in the laboratory. This module will also provide a basic knowledge of the appropriate statistical ideas and methods to use in the collection, presentation and analysis of pharmacological data, and the use of statistical software.

Students will also learn about Informatics finding the correct information online , bioinformatics how computers can be used to analyse genomes, genes and gene products , general scientific reading and writing skills including how to avoid plagiarism , ethics and drug trial design as well as presentation skills in a scientific context.

Friday 9 am - 10 am Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, Friday 9 am - 10 am Lab Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 7: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm Seminar Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 1 pm Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 1 pm. In this module you will be introduced to the embryological development of the major organs and study the nature of different cell types, the structure of different organs and the structure-function relationship of major organs. Your work will include studies on connective tissue, muscle, blood vessels, circulatory system, skin, respiratory system gastrointestinal system, liver and pancreas, urinary system, endocrine system, male reproductive system, female reproductive system, central nervous system, skeletal system, lymphoreticular system, cytology and embryology.

In practicals you will be using microscopes to learn the identification of normal tissues and organs. Weeks 4, 6, 8, Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm. Dr Matthias Dittmar Overlap: This module is a pre-requisite for the 3rd year SBS The case histories will be analysed in group tutorials with subsequent self-directed learning and 6 one hour assessment sessions.

The clinical case histories studied will be chosen from a bank of histories and will embrace, over the entirety of the SBS X modules in years 2 and 3, the disciplines of human physiology, anatomy and development, metabolism, molecular biology and genetics and pharmacology. The tutorial will comprise a 1 hour problem analysis and tutor facilitation session. Assessment of the case history will follow a 3 week period of self directed learning founded on the learning objectives defined in the tutorials.

Weeks 5, 8; Semester 2: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm. Dr Sergey Krysov Overlap: In this module you will look at the following: Structure and organisation of eukaryotic genes; replication and repair of DNA; gene transcription; RNA processing; translation and post-translational processing; control of eukaryotic gene expression; generation of antibody diversity; recombinant DNA technology; basic principles of human molecular genetics; the Human Genome Project; pharmacogenetics and pharmagogenomics; transgenic and knockout mice; and gene therapy.

Tuesday 10 am - 11 am Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm Lab Semester 1: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm IT Class Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm Semester 1: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm.

Dr Mark Preece Overlap: This module provides a detailed survey of the molecular components that mediate neurotransmission in the nervous system and confer plasticity on neurons and nervous systems e. This leads on to the role of such components in various aspects of nervous system function and in control of whole-animal behaviour.

Thursday 11 am - 1 pm IT Class Semester 2: Dr Shane Wilkinson Overlap: The evolution of complex life cycles. The evolution of virulence and the importance of transmission route.

Distributions of parasites within host populations. Effects of parasites on host individuals and populations. Parasite effects on host evolution: Parasite manipulation of host behaviour. Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 11 am Workshop Semester 2: Dr Anthony Michael Overlap: This module reviews all aspects of reproductive and developmental biology from molecular and cellular mechanisms to physiology, ecology and evolution. Topics to be addressed will include molecular gametogenesis, fertilization, embryo development, placentation, pregnancy, parturition, lactation, reproductive and parental strategies, reproductive suppression, courtship and sexual selection, and the evolution of reproductive-isolating mechanisms.

The module will take a comparative approach to compare and contrast reproductive and developmental mechanisms across a range of vertebrate and invertebrate species. Monday 9 am - 11 am Workshop Semester 2: Weeks 3, 9, Monday 2 pm - 4 pm.

Dr Ozge Eyice-Broadbent Overlap: The module will consist of lectures, group discussions, a one-day fieldtrip, and lab practical sessions. Collectively these will cover aspects of microbial diversity, abundance, and function in a variety of both natural and man-made environments, with some emphasis on aquatic systems. The students will also learn about the microbial interactions and how this affects ecosystem services. The work will be both theoretical and practical, with emphasis on current research questions and methodologies in the primary literature.

The content will cover methodological challenges, novel advances in the field, and environmental problem-solving. The module will consist of lectures, group discussions, lab and computer-based practical sessions.

These will cover aspects of climate change, ecosystem services and sustainability, impact of global warming on the ecosystems at different levels and the role of human activities. The students will also learn about the global conservation challenges such as deforestation and habitat fragmentation and modelling simulations in adaptation to climate change. Work will be both theoretical and practical, with emphasis on current research questions in global ecosystem conservation and methodologies in the primary literature.

Monday 11 am - 1 pm Lab Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm IT Class Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm Workshop Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm. Prof Alexander Ruban Overlap: This module covers a wide range of topics, including: A detailed study of structure and function of a selection of membrane proteins.

Examples will illustrate different mechanisms by which proteins achieve vectorial electron transfer, ion transport and the generation of electrochemical gradients, the coupling of electrochemical gradients to ATP synthesis and transmembrane signalling.

Electron transfer through proteins e. Structure and function of redox centres and the proteins that contain them. Membrane proteins studied will include respiratory chain complexes, light-harvesting pigment-proteins, photosynthetic reaction centres, bacteriorhodopsin, rhodopsin, ATP synthase, tyrosine kinase reception.

Friday 9 am - 11 am IT Class Semester 1: An introduction to a number of human diseases, with an emphasis on how these diseases are characterised at the molecular level. Thursday 11 am - 1 pm. This module covers various aspects of enzyme catalysis including: You will also investigate the active site concept and the catalytic and substrate binding properties of amino acid residue sidechains.

Binding energy, driving forces and free energy relationships; the use of kinetic analysis in the study of enzyme mechanism and inhibition; and recent theories on catalysis are also discussed. Several enzyme mechanisms will be described in detail to illustrate the applications of biophysical techniques eg spectroscopy, crystallography and site directed mutagenesis in the study of such mechanisms. Monday 11 am - 1 pm IT Class Semester 2: Dr Vidya Darbari Overlap: In the first part this module will cover the processes of protein biosynthesis, folding and degradation, and assembly of large macromolecular complexes, as well as structure and function of the macromolecular complexes that are involved in these processes.

These complexes include the nucleosome, the ribosome, chaperonins and the proteasome. The module will also cover the relationships between misfolding, formation of amyloid fibres and human disease.

In the second part our present knowledge about structure and function of the following macromolecular assemblies will be presented: Friday 10 am - 12 pm IT Class Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm Workshop Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm. Dr Rob Knell Overlap: This module requires approval from SBCS.

This module is for students enrolled on the programmes C, C and C3C1. In this module you will spend two weeks on field-location in Borneo.

The module is designed to provide you with first-hand experience of ecological processes, biodiversity and conservation issues associated with humid tropical environments. Tropical rainforests are the most biologically diverse habitats on Earth and the loss of rainforest is of tremendous conservation concern, both due to loss of diversity as well as its consequences for global warming. You will spend time working in both terrestrial and aquatic systems, and there will be an emphasis on practical training in ecological survey and assessment methods.

Understanding the nature of the species and how they are defined is a crucial part of modern biology, especially in the context of biodiversity and conservation. This module will cover all aspects of the correct identification and naming of species and higher groups of organisms taxonomy and how these data are used in modern biological research.

The work will be both theoretical and practical, with formal lectures and a fieldtrip. The content will cover challenges in describing biodiversity and advances in the field. Friday 11 am - 1 pm. Dr Christopher Duffy Overlap: This module will provide an advanced training in techniques in biochemistry. In addition to lectures from members of staff and seminars from external speakers, there will be computer and practical workshops to teach methods in molecular biology, structural biology, biophysics and synthetic biology.

Weeks 2, 3, 7: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm Lab Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 4 pm Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 4 pm Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 4 pm Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 4 pm Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 4 pm IT Class Semester 1: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm. Dr Axel Rossberg Overlap: The background, results and conclusions of the study to be reported in the form of an oral presentation part-way through Sem B and a dissertation submitted toward the end of Sem B.

The dissertation will not normally exceed 10, words, which includes a review of relevant literature, data presentation, analysis and discussion.

Friday 12 pm - 2 pm Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm Semester 2: All students wishing to graduate with a degree from the School of Biological and Chemical sciences must undertake a project in their final year of study. In the case of biology related projects, students have three choices: In this module students will: You will also have to either produce a website on a topical biological subject eg environmental, health or ethical scientific issue , or produce a small portfolio of scientific images, either macroscopic or microscopic.

Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm Semester 1: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm Semester 1: Weeks 6, 8, 9, Wednesday 9 am - 11 am Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm Semester 1: Wednesday 2 pm - 3 pm Workshop Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 1 pm. Prof Conrad Bessant Overlap: This module provides an opportunity to further develop and apply skills learned during the previous MSc Bioinformatics modules, by conducting a novel piece of bioinformatics work, typically within an active research group either within QMUL or at a partner organisation.

This serves as excellent preparation for future employment or PhD. Dr Christophe Eizaguirre Overlap: This module involves a novel piece of research, typically combining field sampling, experimentation, laboratory work, and data analysis. Most projects are offered to students so that they can benefit from close alignment with current PhD or Post-doctoral research within specific research groups, both at QMUL or in partner institutions within London.

The diversity of expertise of lecturers involved with the programme means that good supervision can be found for a broad range of studies in ecology and evolutionary biology. Dissertations may be undertaken with the assistance and guidance of relevant external organisations with the proviso that a suitable SBCS supervisor is also identified. The dissertation aims to make a novel contribution to scientific knowledge.

In undertaking such an extensive project, you are expected to demonstrate a sound understanding of project design, sample collection, data analysis, and the ability to produce a coherent and well structured piece of written reporting. From February through to the end of July, you should be undertaking lab or field work, and then writing up in August for an early September submission. This module provides an opportunity to further develop and apply skills learned during the previous MSc EEG modules, by conducting a novel piece of genome analysis work, typically within an active research group either within QMUL or at partner organisation.

The diversity of expertise of lecturers involved with the programme means that high quality supervision can be found for a broad range of studies in plant and fungal biology, ecology and evolution. Students will be encouraged to choose a project from a diverse range of subjects closely aligned to existing cutting edge research programmes in Aquatic Ecology in its very broad sense research groups of SBCS.

Some may have ties to external agencies such as the Environment Agency. Students will be encouraged to identify advisors within the first half of semester 1 in order to start the heavy part of the research project in January. The preparation of the thesis will involve the majority of the following stages: This module provides an introduction to bioinformatics, focusing specifically on the analysis of DNA sequence data. Lectures cover the bioinformatics methods, algorithms and resources used for tasks such as sequence assembly, gene finding and genome annotation, phylogenetics, analysis of genomic variance among populations, genome wide association studies and prediction of gene structure and function.

Practical exercises are used to gain experience with relevant existing bioinformatics tools, data formats and databases. IT Class Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 5 pm Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 5 pm Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 5 pm Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 5 pm Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 5 pm. This module provides a hands-on introduction to computer programming popularly known as coding using scripting languages popular in the field.

The focus is on producing robust software for repeatable data-centric scientific work. Key programming concepts are introduced, and these concepts are then brought together in scientifically relevant applications to analyse data, interact with a database and create dynamic web content.

Good coding practice, such as the importance of documentation and version control, is emphasised throughout. Weeks 4, 5, This module provides an introduction to bioinformatics, focusing specifically on the management and analysis of data produced by so-called post-genomic methods such as transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics. Lectures cover the bioinformatics methods, algorithms and resources used for tasks such as the identification and quantitation of transcripts, proteins and metabolites, and analysis of the interactions between these key biological molecules.

Practical exercises are used to gain experience with bioinformatics tools, data formats and databases that have been developed for this field. Monday 9 am - 1 pm Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 5 pm Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 1 pm Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 5 pm Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 1 pm Semester 1: Wednesday 1 pm - 5 pm Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 1 pm Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 5 pm Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 1 pm Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 5 pm Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 5 pm.

Each team is given the same written specification for a piece of software that must be delivered by the end of the module. Each team must design an appropriate software architecture and development plan, with specific tasks assigned to individual team members.

The project involves elements from the previous bioinformatics modules genomics, post-genomics, coding and statistics as well as new topics that are introduced during the module.

This module serves as a simulation of a real software development environment, providing invaluable experience for future employability. IT Class Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Monday 10 am - 5 pm Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 5 pm Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am - 5 pm Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 5 pm Semester 2: E-mail Password Forgot your password?

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Introduction. One of Shakespeare’s earlier plays, Romeo and Juliet is one of two tragedies written between The play is based on a fourteenth-century Italian short story, or novella, yet Shakespeare’s version of .

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Script of Act II Romeo and Juliet The play by William Shakespeare. Introduction This section contains the script of Act II of Romeo and Juliet the play by William glenmecu.gq enduring works of William Shakespeare feature many famous and well loved characters.

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Shakespeare’s play Romeo and Juliet models a traditional love story for today’s entertainment. Romeo and Juliet chronicles the feuding. SparkNotes are the most helpful study guides around to literature, math, science, and more. Find sample tests, essay help, and translations of Shakespeare.

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Romeo and Juliet was written by William Shakespeare in the late sixteenth century and was probably first performed in the Globe Theatre in London. A vast bank of printable worksheet resources exploring how Shakespeare shows the changing character of Juliet. Full scenes and language analysis of each key scene and worksheets for the scenes assessing how the character .